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Nachts schlafen die Spione

Martin Schlüter

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GERMAN
29.4 x 26 cm
160 Pages
113 Ills. in color
HARDCOVER WITH JACKET
available

ISBN 978-3-944874-03-6


A POIGNANT LAST LOOK BEFORE THE CLOSURE OF THE BND HEADQUARTERS IN PULLACH

Sixty years after its founding, Germany’s BND (Federal Intelligence Service) is relocating from Pullach to Berlin, with large sections of the Pullach headquarters slated for demolition. Photographer Martin Schlüter was allowed to document the area freely and fully for the BND. The result is a superb photographic portrait that captivates from the first to the last image.

Advancing spy-like, step by step, the viewer embarks on a night-time investigation of a world that has remained closed and secretive for decades. Behind these walls, empty offices appear in dim artificial light—just-abandoned spaces filled with historical references and astonishing personal details of the BND employees who are not allowed to be pictured.

The observer is forced to question everything he discovers in these photographs: does our media-influenced image of the secret service bear any relation to the reality? A rare glimpse inside an agency that is synonymous with foreign intelligence, espionage, and absolute secrecy.

Martin Schlüter, born in 1977, has worked as a photographer for a number of publications, including Der Spiegel, GEO, mare, and Die Zeit. In 2012, he became the first photographer to receive the CNN Journalist of the Year Award.

Prof. Klaus Honnef was Chief Exhibition Officer at the Rheinischen Landesmuseum in Bonn from 1974 to 1999. An art historian and author of countless books, Honnef has greatly contributed to the recognition of photography in the visual arts since the 1970s, particularly in his role as contributing curator to both  documenta 5 and 6. A freelance critic since 2000, he has written for Kunstzeitung and Photonews, among other publications. In 2011, he was awarded the Culture Prize of the German Society for Photography.

Dr. Niklas Maak, born in Hamburg in 1972, heads the art department of the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung together with Julia Voss. He was awarded the Henri Nannen Prize in 2012, the George F. Kennan Prize in 2009, and the COR Prize for architectural criticism in 2014. He lives in Berlin.